Gilbert Adum Wins Grants From Mohammed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund and Prince Bernhard Nature Fund

Congratulations to SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Executive Director Gilbert Adum for winning US$25,000 from the Mohammed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund and €20,000 from Prince Bernhard Nature Fund. The grants will fund SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s efforts to restore and protect habitat for the critically endangered Intermediate Puddle Frog (Phrynobatrachus intermedius) and co-occurring species. Continue reading Gilbert Adum Wins Grants From Mohammed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund and Prince Bernhard Nature Fund

Volunteer Position: SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Campaigns Assistant

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana seeks a volunteer to help with our campaign to save the critically endangered Togo Slippery Frog (Conraua derooi). The campaign is comprised of two primary goals: (1) prevent bauxite mining in and around the frog’s habitat; and (2) create the Atewa National Park to permanently protect the frogs and their long-term chance of survival. Continue reading Volunteer Position: SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Campaigns Assistant

The Giant Squeaker Frog Is Now Officially Listed As Critically Endangered

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s efforts have resulted in a huge victory for the Giant Squeaker Frog (Arthroleptis krokosua). From 2015 through early 2019, SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Co-Founders Dr. Kerry Kriger and Gilbert Adum campaigned for the re-categorization of the Giant Squeaker Frog by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), from Near Threatened to Critically Endangered. Success was achieved in March 2019 with the IUCN officially re-categorizing the frog as Critically Endangered. This new listing will help the Giant Squeaker Frog receive significantly increased protections and will enable conservation groups like SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana to more easily secure funding for conservation programs in and around the frog’s habitat in western Ghana. Continue reading The Giant Squeaker Frog Is Now Officially Listed As Critically Endangered

Save The Frogs Day Mega Protest In Accra To Prevent Mining Of The Atewa Forest

As part of this year’s Save The Frogs Day celebrations, SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana will join forces with local groups to campaign in Accra on June 5th, 2019. STF! Ghana members and other protesters will march to the seat of government and the Forestry Commission of Ghana to demand an immediate termination of impending bauxite mining operations at the Atewa Range Forest Reserve. Continue reading Save The Frogs Day Mega Protest In Accra To Prevent Mining Of The Atewa Forest

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana To Co-Host The 17th African Amphibian Working Group Meeting

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana (West Africa’s first non-profit organization dedicated exclusively to amphibian conservation) will co-host the 17th African Amphibian Working Group (AAWG) meeting in Kumasi, from 25th to 28th July 2017. The AAWG meeting, the first to be hosted in Ghana, is an occasion for amphibian conservation scientists to discuss the progress and the way forward in amphibian research and protection on the continent. It will also be an opportunity for early career conservationists and students to network with professionals from all over the world and from co-hosting institutions including Herp Conservation Ghana and the Museum of Natural History Berlin.

hyperolius bobirensis metamorph

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SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Member Wins Grant To Save The World’s Smallest Crocodile

Congratulations to Albert Chambichoga of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s KNUST Chapter for winning a £5,000 (US$6,379) grant to identify and survey critical habitat areas of the West African Dwarf Crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis), which is the world’s smallest crocodile species. The grant is from the prestigious Rufford Small Grants Foundation, based in the United Kingdom. The grant will allow Albert and his team to estimate the population size of the crocodiles along the stretch of the Wewe River that flows through the campus of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST). The team will also re-forest degraded habitats, draft a Wewe Catchment Dwarf Crocodile Conservation Action Plan, and engage the public through folklores. These efforts will augment conservation activities already underway through the KNUST Wewe River Amphibian Project (K-WRAP) that protects the 12 resident frog species.

West African Dwarf Crocodile Osteolaemus tetraspis
Photo of West African Dwarf Crocodile on the KNUST campus by SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Co-Founder Dr. Kerry Kriger, taken during the 2016 SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition.

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Amphibian Research Assistant Positions In Kumasi, Ghana

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana seeks three undergraduate research assistants to assist in the collection of vital data on the biology and ecology of amphibians, as part of its Wewe River Amphibian Project (K-WRAP). The project is in collaboration with the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Wildlife Department, and is funded by the UK-based Rufford Foundation. The project goes from June 2017 to April 2018. This is a volunteer position in which SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana will cover the successful applicant’s project expenses. Collected data will also form part of successful applicants’ undergraduate thesis. Prior to taking up the position, a three-month training will be given on amphibian monitoring protocols including taxonomy, systematics and data collection.

Deadline for submission of application documents (refer to ‘How to apply’ section below) is 9th June 2017.

k-wrap wewe river
Frog researchers from the SAVE THE FROGS! KNUST chapter.

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Ghana KNUST Chapter Wins Grant to Monitor Endangered Frogs along the Wewe River

Congratulations to SAVE THE FROGS! KNUST Chapter for winning their second grant from the UK-based Rufford Foundation. The £5,000 (~$6,000) award will enable the chapter to monitor endangered frogs with cutting-edge surveying technology. Chapter members will deploy automated acoustic devices along the KNUST campus’ Wewe River to monitor endangered frogs as part of the KNUST Wewe River Amphibian Project (K-WRAP). Additionally, the students will plant 1,000 native trees, in addition to providing and waste bins to dispose of trash properly along the Wewe River. Campaigns to use the trash bins to help protect the river and its frogs will spread the conservation message in the Kumasi urban areas and beyond.
KNUST chapter planting trees along wewe river
The SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana KNUST Chapter is the first student-run organization of the USA-based SAVE THE FROGS!, based in Kumasi, Ghana. Revegetating river corridors like the Wewe River (pictured), where rare frogs occur, is a major pillar of their campaign to save Ghana’s frogs.
 

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Why The Giant Squeaker Frog Is “Giant”

Frogs in the genus Arthroleptis are often referred to as “squeakers.” This is because of the distinctive high pitched call they make. They are usually small — about the size of a baby’s thumb — with the smallest squeaker measuring merely 15mm in length. The Giant Squeaker Frog (Arthroleptis krokosua) measures up to 50mm, making it the largest squeaker in all of West Africa. As it is about three times the size of the smallest squeaker it must be nothing less than a GIANT!

ghana-goal-squeaker

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