Dr. Kerry Kriger Visits India & Bangladesh

Empowering Indian & Bangladeshi Citizens To Protect Amphibian Populations:SAVE THE FROGS! Founder Dr. Kerry Kriger Visits India & Bangladesh From December 2017 through February 2018, I will visit SAVE THE FROGS! volunteers in Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Rajasthan, Delhi, Dhaka, Chittagong & Sylhet to give presentations and assist them in increasing the effectiveness of their efforts … Continue reading Dr. Kerry Kriger Visits India & Bangladesh

SAVE THE FROGS! built a wetland at Garvey Intermediate School in Los Angeles

SAVE THE FROGS! is proud to be building wetlands at schools. We are merging conservation and education by building wetlands that will be used for outdoor education. More importantly, we are building wetlands in urban environment. Historically, the majority of humans lived in rural areas where they farmed and hunted regularly. In 1800, only three … Continue reading SAVE THE FROGS! built a wetland at Garvey Intermediate School in Los Angeles

SAVE THE FROGS! and UCLA build wetlands for California Tiger Salamanders

Earlier this year, UCLA researchers asked SAVE THE FROGS! to help them build 18 research wetlands in Monterey, CA. The aim of the project is to assist the endangered California Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma californiense; hereafter CTS). The CTS is an endemic species only found in California, making it an important amphibian to protect. On June … Continue reading SAVE THE FROGS! and UCLA build wetlands for California Tiger Salamanders

Building a Wetland at Garvey Intermediate School in Los Angeles County

Many urban children have never seen a frog in the wild. With over 90% of California’s wetlands drained and amphibians declining at unprecedented rates, it is becoming increasingly rare that children come into contact with amphibians. Nature deficit disorder is a significant problem in American children, and it is well documented that spending time in nature helps students concentrate and leads to increased test scores. SAVE THE FROGS! believes that by creating wetlands at schools, we can assist both amphibians and children.

Garvey Intermediate School is a middle school of 7th and 8th graders located in eastern Los Angeles County. On October 7th, 2017, Garvey will become the first school in Southern California to host a SAVE THE FROGS! wetland construction event! This school has taken a huge step forward in saying that the environment matters, the student’s education matters and environmental science matters. Creating the wetland with the students’ assistance will encourage stewardship of wetland habitats and provide students with an educational and empowering experience. These kinds of steps taken at schools help children in cities develop a connection with nature that will later lead them to vote environmentally friendly or even become amphibian biologists!

Building this wetland will provide students with an outdoor science classroom, an attractive and interesting landscape, increased opportunities for wildlife viewing, and an exciting place to explore. The project will greatly improve bird, butterfly, dragonfly and frog habitat at their school.

Garvey school wetlands
Garvey students with Wetland Coordinator Kathlyn Franco Osagie after teaching the students how to test the soil’s clay content — an important step in determining how to construct the wetland.

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Federal Action To Assist Frogs In The Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

In 2009, SAVE THE FROGS! supporters sent in over 700 comment letters to the National Park Service (NPS) urging them to remove non-native fish from over 60 water bodies in the Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. This constituted over 95% of the comments received by the NPS and paved the way for federal action to assist threatened Mountain Yellow-Legged Frogs (Rana muscosa). It took the NPS seven years to make a decision…but they decided to assist the frogs by removing non-native fish from the parks, and in 2016 released this Record of Decision. The NPS’ announcement of the decision is below. Victory for the frogs! Thank you to all our supporters who submitted comment, and thank you to the NPS for taking action for amphibians.

mountain yellow legged frog
Photo of Mountain Yellow-Legged Frogs courtesy Dr. Vance Vredenburg

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Buenos Aires Coastal Cleanup

On September 17th, 2016, SAVE THE FROGS! Buenos Aires took part in the 1st Census and Cleanup of the Costanera Norte Ecological Reserve (RECN) as part of the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup. SAVE THE FROGS! volunteers from the Buenos Aires community helped in the census and helped to clean part of the Rio de la Plata’s estuary coastline and the reserve’s wetland. We thank Grupo de Educación y Conservación Ambiental FCEyN for inviting us. We are really happy for this chance to help the reserve’s environment and all the amphibians that inhabit it! Working together we can improve the world we live in and save the frogs!

buenos aires frogs

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SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Wins Grant To Save Endangered Frogs from Wildfires

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana has secured a £10,000 grant (~US$12,000) from the UK-based Rufford Foundation to save endangered frogs from wildfires in Sui Forest, home of the iconic Giant Squeaker Frog (Arthroleptis krokosua). In collaboration with the Ghana National Fire Service, the team will rehabilitate critical frog habitat that has been degraded by fire, and … Continue reading SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Wins Grant To Save Endangered Frogs from Wildfires

Wetland Success in Plumas National Forest

Thanks to the very generous donations of twenty SAVE THE FROGS! supporters, we were able to assist in the construction of six wetlands in June/July 2017! The three wetlands in Elgin, AZ were built to provide habitat for the threatened Chiricahua Leopard Frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis). The other three wetlands are in Plumas National Forest, and serve as habitat for the California Red-Legged Frog (Rana draytonii). On June 28th and 29th, 2017, SAVE THE FROGS! Ecologist Kathlyn Franco Osagie served as an assistant instructor at a US Forest Service wetland construction workshop, helping to educate hydrologists, botanists and engineers about wetland construction techniques. These wetland projects are huge successes. The wetlands we built in Eldorado National Forest in 2014 and 2016 are holding water and being used by California Red-Legged Frogs. At Plumas National Forest two of the wetlands we built this summer are already holding water (they filled with pre-existing groundwater). The third wetland uses a pesticide-free plastic liner and is expected to fill once the first rains come.

plumas national forest wetlands
Plumas National Forest: one of the two groundwater wetlands we built for the California Red-Legged Frog (Rana draytonii).

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