SAVE THE FROGS! and UCLA build wetlands for California Tiger Salamanders

Earlier this year, UCLA researchers asked SAVE THE FROGS! to help them build 18 research wetlands in Monterey, CA. The aim of the project is to assist the endangered California Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma californiense; hereafter CTS). The CTS is an endemic species only found in California, making it an important amphibian to protect. On June … Continue reading SAVE THE FROGS! and UCLA build wetlands for California Tiger Salamanders

Building a Wetland at Garvey Intermediate School in Los Angeles County

Many urban children have never seen a frog in the wild. With over 90% of California’s wetlands drained and amphibians declining at unprecedented rates, it is becoming increasingly rare that children come into contact with amphibians. Nature deficit disorder is a significant problem in American children, and it is well documented that spending time in nature helps students concentrate and leads to increased test scores. SAVE THE FROGS! believes that by creating wetlands at schools, we can assist both amphibians and children.

Garvey Intermediate School is a middle school of 7th and 8th graders located in eastern Los Angeles County. On October 7th, 2017, Garvey will become the first school in Southern California to host a SAVE THE FROGS! wetland construction event! This school has taken a huge step forward in saying that the environment matters, the student’s education matters and environmental science matters. Creating the wetland with the students’ assistance will encourage stewardship of wetland habitats and provide students with an educational and empowering experience. These kinds of steps taken at schools help children in cities develop a connection with nature that will later lead them to vote environmentally friendly or even become amphibian biologists!

Building this wetland will provide students with an outdoor science classroom, an attractive and interesting landscape, increased opportunities for wildlife viewing, and an exciting place to explore. The project will greatly improve bird, butterfly, dragonfly and frog habitat at their school.

Garvey school wetlands
Garvey students with Wetland Coordinator Kathlyn Franco Osagie after teaching the students how to test the soil’s clay content — an important step in determining how to construct the wetland.

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Federal Action To Assist Frogs In The Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

In 2009, SAVE THE FROGS! supporters sent in over 700 comment letters to the National Park Service (NPS) urging them to remove non-native fish from over 60 water bodies in the Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. This constituted over 95% of the comments received by the NPS and paved the way for federal action to assist threatened Mountain Yellow-Legged Frogs (Rana muscosa). It took the NPS seven years to make a decision…but they decided to assist the frogs by removing non-native fish from the parks, and in 2016 released this Record of Decision. The NPS’ announcement of the decision is below. Victory for the frogs! Thank you to all our supporters who submitted comment, and thank you to the NPS for taking action for amphibians.

mountain yellow legged frog
Photo of Mountain Yellow-Legged Frogs courtesy Dr. Vance Vredenburg

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Buenos Aires Coastal Cleanup

On September 17th, 2016, SAVE THE FROGS! Buenos Aires took part in the 1st Census and Cleanup of the Costanera Norte Ecological Reserve (RECN) as part of the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup. SAVE THE FROGS! volunteers from the Buenos Aires community helped in the census and helped to clean part of the Rio de la Plata’s estuary coastline and the reserve’s wetland. We thank Grupo de Educación y Conservación Ambiental FCEyN for inviting us. We are really happy for this chance to help the reserve’s environment and all the amphibians that inhabit it! Working together we can improve the world we live in and save the frogs!

buenos aires frogs

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SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Wins Grant To Save Endangered Frogs from Wildfires

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana has secured a £10,000 grant (~US$12,000) from the UK-based Rufford Foundation to save endangered frogs from wildfires in Sui Forest, home of the iconic Giant Squeaker Frog (Arthroleptis krokosua). In collaboration with the Ghana National Fire Service, the team will rehabilitate critical frog habitat that has been degraded by fire, and … Continue reading SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Wins Grant To Save Endangered Frogs from Wildfires

Wetland Success in Plumas National Forest

Thanks to the very generous donations of twenty SAVE THE FROGS! supporters, we were able to assist in the construction of six wetlands in June/July 2017! The three wetlands in Elgin, AZ were built to provide habitat for the threatened Chiricahua Leopard Frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis). The other three wetlands are in Plumas National Forest, and serve as habitat for the California Red-Legged Frog (Rana draytonii). On June 28th and 29th, 2017, SAVE THE FROGS! Ecologist Kathlyn Franco Osagie served as an assistant instructor at a US Forest Service wetland construction workshop, helping to educate hydrologists, botanists and engineers about wetland construction techniques. These wetland projects are huge successes. The wetlands we built in Eldorado National Forest in 2014 and 2016 are holding water and being used by California Red-Legged Frogs. At Plumas National Forest two of the wetlands we built this summer are already holding water (they filled with pre-existing groundwater). The third wetland uses a pesticide-free plastic liner and is expected to fill once the first rains come.

plumas national forest wetlands
Plumas National Forest: one of the two groundwater wetlands we built for the California Red-Legged Frog (Rana draytonii).

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SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Member Wins Grant To Save The World’s Smallest Crocodile

Congratulations to Albert Chambichoga of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s KNUST Chapter for winning a £5,000 (US$6,379) grant to identify and survey critical habitat areas of the West African Dwarf Crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis), which is the world’s smallest crocodile species. The grant is from the prestigious Rufford Small Grants Foundation, based in the United Kingdom. The grant will allow Albert and his team to estimate the population size of the crocodiles along the stretch of the Wewe River that flows through the campus of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST). The team will also re-forest degraded habitats, draft a Wewe Catchment Dwarf Crocodile Conservation Action Plan, and engage the public through folklores. These efforts will augment conservation activities already underway through the KNUST Wewe River Amphibian Project (K-WRAP) that protects the 12 resident frog species.

West African Dwarf Crocodile Osteolaemus tetraspis
Photo of West African Dwarf Crocodile on the KNUST campus by SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Co-Founder Dr. Kerry Kriger, taken during the 2016 SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition.

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Building Wetlands in Elgin, Arizona

Dear SAVE THE FROGS! Supporters,

I am excited to announce that thanks to 13 generous donors who contributed $1,962 to the SAVE THE FROGS! wetland program, I was able to build three large wetlands in Elgin, AZ in early June 2017. These wetlands are at the Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch of the National Audubon Society. One of the three wetlands already has water in it and we expect the others to fill as soon as the rains come. These wetlands will benefit at least three threatened species: the Chiricahua Leopard Frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis); the Northern Mexican Gartersnake (Thamnophis equesmegalops); and the Desert Pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius).

Kathlyn Franco Tom Biebighauser
SAVE THE FROGS! Wetland Coordinator Kathlyn Franco Osagie and wetland construction expert Tom Biebighauser excited to be building wetlands for threatened species.

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Introducing Students To The Amphibians Of Lapinha Da Serra

Com a crescente perda populacional de anfíbios, torna-se necessário iniciativas que busquem amenizar os impactos causados a esse grupo de vertebrados. A educação ambiental é uma ótima ferramenta para tal. A ONG SAVE THE FROGS! criada em 2008 pelo Dr. Kerry Kriger, no estado da Califórnia, tem como objetivo proteger populações de anfíbios e promover uma sociedade que respeite e valorize a natureza e a vida selvagem. Em 2017, foi instituída a SAVE THE FROGS! Minas Gerais, presidida pelo biólogo Cleiton Caetano, que conta com ajuda de da vice-presidente Ana Frois, Secretário Davi Oliveira, coordenadora de comunicações Camille Aleixo, tesoureira Paula Araujo, que tem mesmo objetivo, porém com foco em Minas Gerais Brasil. Nos dias 22 e 23 de maio, a SAVE THE FROGS! Minas Gerais, desenvolveu um projeto juntamente com uma escola de Belo Horizonte, denominada Escola da Serra, que está localizada na Rua do Ouro, n. 1900, Bairro Serra. Uma escola que foge dos métodos de ensinos tradicionais, esta adota uma metodologia no qual o estudante tem a liberdade em aprender da forma que for mais fácil para ele, tornando-os pessoas mais críticas e com espírito investigativo.

With the increasing decline in amphibian populations, initiatives are needed that mitigate the impacts caused to these vertebrates, and environmental education is a great tool for this. SAVE THE FROGS! was created in 2008 by Dr. Kerry Kriger, in the state of California. It aims to protect amphibians’ population and to build up a society that respects and appreciate nature and wildlife. In 2017 we established SAVE THE FROGS! Minas Gerais, presided over by the biologist Cleiton Caetano, and supported by the Vice-President Ana Frois, the secretary Davi Oliveira, the communications coordinator Camille Aleixo, and the treasurer Paula Araujo. With the same goal, but focused on Minas Gerais, Brazil, SAVE THE FROGS! Minas Gerais conducted a project along with a school in Belo Horizonte (Escola da Serra) on May 22nd/23rd, 2017. This school does not apply traditional teaching methods, and adopts a methodology in which the students have the freedom to decide the easiest way to learn for them, giving them a more critical investigative view.

save the frogs minas gerais
Diretores da SAVE THE FROGS! Minas Gerais
Directors of SAVE THE FROGS! Minas Gerais

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