Amphibian Research Assistant Positions In Kumasi, Ghana

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana seeks three undergraduate research assistants to assist in the collection of vital data on the biology and ecology of amphibians, as part of its Wewe River Amphibian Project (K-WRAP). The project is in collaboration with the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Wildlife Department, and is funded by the UK-based Rufford Foundation. The project goes from June 2017 to April 2018. This is a volunteer position in which SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana will cover the successful applicant's project expenses. Collected data will also form part of successful applicants’ undergraduate thesis. Prior to taking up the position, a three-month training will be given on amphibian monitoring protocols including taxonomy, systematics and data collection.

Deadline for submission of application documents (refer to ‘How to apply’ section below) is 9th June 2017.

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Frog researchers from the SAVE THE FROGS! KNUST chapter.

Read more: Amphibian Research Assistant Positions In Kumasi, Ghana

Protecting 5,000 hectares of critical frog habitat in Ghana

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana is in the process of securing funding for the protection of 5,000 hectares (12,355 acres) of critical frog habitat in the Sui Forest area of western Ghana. The Sui Forest and the approximately 30 amphibian species that call Sui home are subject to four major threats: logging, alien species invasion, farming and wildfires.

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SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Co-Founder Gilbert Adum surveying a pond on a logging road in the Sui Forest during the 2016 SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition. Gilbert is the first amphibian biologist to survey the Sui region; he began his efforts there in 2008.

The unsustainable logging practices of timber companies, coupled with widespread illegal logging activities by local people have degraded and fragmented the forest. There are also several pockets of illegal and legal farms within critical habitat areas. Both the farming and logging have facilitated the invasion of Chromolaena odorata, a non-native plant species that is a major threat to biodiversity throughout the tropics. The invasive alien plant C. odorata forms dense thickets that impede the frogs’ dispersal; it also releases chemicals into the soil that prevent the growth of native plants. Additionally, C. odorata depletes the density of leaf-litter that leaf-litter frogs utilize for predator escape, breeding activities and protection from desiccation. The occurrence of C. odorata also makes the forest more susceptible to wildfires. Combined with the burning of trees by honey collectors to smoke out bees, forest fires in the Sui area have become increasingly common; for instance in 2016, wildfires destroyed large parts of Sui Forest and Krokosua Hills Forest Reserve, the original home of the Giant Squeaker Frog (Arthroleptis krokosua). The fires destroyed at least 5,000 native trees that we had previously planted to restore critical frog habitat. 

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition
Members of the 2016 SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition surveying a stream in the Sui Forest that is home to amphibians that were unknown to science until SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana biologists discovered them in mid-2016. The stream is under severe threat from nearby logging and the erosion it causes.

To ensure the long-term survival of the regions amphibian species, SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana has initiated efforts to:
(1) Improve our knowledge of the distribution of amphibian species in the Sui Forest; SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana is the only organization that has conducted research in the Sui Forest area, and we are still finding new amphibian populations.
(2) Survey landowners and community leaders to determine current land ownership, historical land prices and leasing opportunities. Land in the area is not available for sale, but is available for long-term lease.
(3) Research and apply for funding from non-profit organizations and foundations that fund land acquisition.

I personally do appreciate your great works for mankind and the natural environment and I believe together we can build a better future for mankind, and a formidable protected habitat for frogs and other amphibians worldwide.
- N. Aidoo, Ghana

Ghana rainforest
Look at that beautiful webbing!

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana's efforts in the Sui region are primarily aimed at the following amphibian species, which are under a significant degree of threat due to their small population sizes and the above-mentioned threats to their habitat:

  • Giant Squeaker Frog (Arthroleptis krokosua). This is one of the world's rarest frogs, with extant population estimated to be 30 total individuals. All known surviving populations are restricted to the proposed Sanctuary.
  • Ringed River Frog (Phrynobatrachus annulatus, Endangered)
  • Yapo River Frog (P. villiersi, Vulnerable)
  • Ivory Coast Frog (Amnirana occidentalis, Endangered)
  • A recently discovered Slippery Frog (Conraua) species whose population estimate is 20 total individuals, with all known individuals restricted to a 1km section of a single stream threatened by logging, farming and potential mining.
  • A recently discovered Phrynobatrachus species known from only a single record.

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana funding comes almost exclusively from international sources, including frog enthusiasts like YOU who support our efforts. To donate to SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana, simply place a donation at www.savethefrogs.com/donate and then email contact@savethefrogs.com asking us to direct your donations to our efforts in Ghana. Thank you for your support!

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A lesson in aerodynamics and a beneficiary of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana's efforts to protect the incredible amphibian fauna of Ghana's Sui Forest.

Meet Ghana’s Beloved “Lady”: The Night Spirit Frog

The Night Spirit Frog (Leptopelis spiritusnoctis) is considered Ghana’s most beloved frog. For many artists and frog lovers in Ghana and around the globe, it is the poster child for the beauty of nature, thanks first and foremost to its distinctively large silver-grey eyes, just one feature that makes it particularly adorable.
 
Night spirit frog

Read more: Meet Ghana’s Beloved “Lady”: The Night Spirit Frog

Ghana KNUST Chapter Wins Grant to Monitor Endangered Frogs along the Wewe River

Congratulations to SAVE THE FROGS! KNUST Chapter for winning their second grant from the UK-based Rufford Foundation. The £5,000 (~$6,000) award will enable the chapter to monitor endangered frogs with cutting-edge surveying technology. Chapter members will deploy automated acoustic devices along the KNUST campus’ Wewe River to monitor endangered frogs as part of the KNUST Wewe River Amphibian Project (K-WRAP). Additionally, the students will plant 1,000 native trees, in addition to providing and waste bins to dispose of trash properly along the Wewe River. Campaigns to use the trash bins to help protect the river and its frogs will spread the conservation message in the Kumasi urban areas and beyond.
 
KNUST chapter planting trees along wewe river
The SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana KNUST Chapter is the first student-run organization of the USA-based SAVE THE FROGS!, based in Kumasi, Ghana. Revegetating river corridors like the Wewe River (pictured), where rare frogs occur, is a major pillar of their campaign to save Ghana's frogs.
 
 
Previously, biologists throughout Africa have relied primarily on traditional survey methods such as walking streams to listen for frogs, or using traps and bare hands to catch frogs. These methods are time-consuming and can disturb frogs and their habitats. However, remotely-operated acoustic devices will record and store frog calls automatically for subsequent analysis and identification. The employment of this new technology will provide reliable results without necessarily having physical contact with frogs or disturbing their fragile habitats.
 
KNUST chapter field training
The members of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana KNUST Chapter learn about amphibians in the field under the tutelage of Gilbert Adum, one of West Africa's most prominent herpetologists.
 
 
Due to its geographical and biodiversity importance, the Wewe River was selected by students to pilot the use of the acoustic devices. Wewe River is a primary drainage system for one of southern Ghana’s largest watersheds and also home to 12 frog species and several other important wildlife species such as the vulnerable West African Dwarf Crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis). Unfortunately, many of these species’ populations are declining drastically due to illegal farming activities, fuel-wood extraction, and inappropriate waste disposal in the Wewe River. Thus, K-WRAP initiated as a timely rapid response to prevent the disappearance of frogs. Without frogs, the Wewe River would support the high local biodiversity present today.

To learn more about K-WRAP, please visit:
www.savethefrogs2.com/easyblog/restoring-degraded-habitats-for-amphibians-in-southern-ghana

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition: Summary of Successes from Week 1

The SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition was a huge success! In September 2016, our international team of American and Ghanaian staff and volunteers traveled throughout Ghana for three weeks, conducting a variety of educational programs and habitat restoration events. Some successes from the first week of the expedition include:
 
(1) Speaking to the entire incoming class of freshmen (nearly 500 students) at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology (KNUST) Faculty of Renewable Natural Resources.
 
Ghana Expedition Kumasi KNUST

Why The Giant Squeaker Frog Is "Giant"

Frogs in the genus Arthroleptis are often referred to as "squeakers." This is because of the distinctive insect-like call they make and are also called cricket or screeching frogs. They are usually small, most about the size of a baby’s thumb, with the smallest squeaker measuring merely 15mm in length. The Giant Squeaker Frog (Arthroleptis krokosua) measures up to 50mm, making it the largest squeaker in the whole of West Africa. As it is about three times the size of the smallest squeaker it must be nothing less than a “GIANT.”  The Giant Squeaker Frog mainly differs from other squeakers in its much broader head. Their color can vary but most of them are golden brown, making the Giant Squeaker Frog possibly the world’s most beautiful squeaker. Unlike other squeakers they also have a distinctive “hour-glass pattern” on their back and rounded black spots on their belly. But as far as their reproduction is concerned, they are presumed to be like all other squeakers: they are among the few frogs in the world that are direct developers, meaning they bypass the tadpole stage! They lay their eggs on leaf-litter, which then hatch directly into baby frogs called froglets that resemble their parents in every way except for their tiny size. But mind you, a baby Giant Squeaker Frog may be about the same size or even bigger than the adults of some other squeakers. Again, it is the simple reason the Giant Squeaker Frog is “GIANT’.

To win wonderful souvenirs from SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana answer questions about this article by following the link.
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SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Travels to the United Kingdom

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s Associate Executive Director and West Africa’s first female amphibian conservation scientist, Miss Sandra Owusu-Gyamfi will travel to the United Kingdom from 20th December 2016 to 10th January 2017. During her stay, Sandra will give educational presentations about amphibians, empower women in conservation and the activities of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana. Spend the season with Sandra to learn some of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s great achievements such as winning awards including the prestigious Green Oscar from the Whitley Fund for Nature; new frog discoveries; establishing West Africa’s first amphibian education centre; replanting 20-ha of critical amphibian habitats with +15,000 native trees; providing beekeeping as alternative livelihood for local people; gaining international media attention and many more. Sandra will also be visiting funders including the Rufford Foundation and the Whitley Fund for Nature to update them on how their funded projects are progressing.

sui celebration sandra owusu gyamfi 1a ms

You can take this opportunity to invite Sandra over to your local school or group for a presentation or discussion on possible collaborations and volunteering with West Africa’s leading amphibian research and conservation organisation. Please send an email of interest to contact@savethefrogs.com for an advance booking.

Kumbugu Group

In 2014 Sandra travelled to the UK and presented to about 500 individuals at institutions and groups such as the University of Cambridge, Nottingham and Greenwich, the British Herpetology Society and the Harrison Institute (www.savethefrogs2.com/easyblog/save-the-frogs-ghana-programmes-co-ordinator-s-visit-to-uk-makes-huge-waves). Sandra uses such visits to inspire and give hope to scientists and conservationists which she believes is key in addressing many conservation challenges.

Gilbert Adum of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Featured in Worldwide Documentary

Watch this documentary about SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Executive Director Gilbert Adum's passion for frogs and about our work to save the last Giant Squeaker Frogs (Arthroleptis krokosua) and improve the lives of the Yawkrom community in the Sui River Forest Reserve.

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ghana stf dw tv

During the SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition, a German film crew from Deutsche Wela (DW-TV) traveled with our team to Yawkrom and the Sui forest in order to document the incredible work of Gilbert and SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana. This documentary will be broadcast around the world.

Broadcast Times:
14.10.2016 | 21:30 on DW‎ (12:30 PST, 19:30 GMT)
15.10.2016 | 05:30 on DW‎ (20:30 PST, 3:30 GMT)
Or watch the entire episode here.

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana has become a symbol of hope and inspiration for West African amphibian conservation efforts. We are confident that this documentary will further educate and empower the thousands who watch it in order to protect amphibians in their own communities.

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Thank you for your continued support and please share this exciting video with your frog-saving friends!


Highlights from the 2016 SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition

In September 2016, SAVE THE FROGS! led an international team of amphibian biologists on the inaugural SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition. The mission of the expedition was to protect Ghana’s amphibian populations, empower the next generation of Ghanaian frog conservationists, and expand the international network of environmentalists interested in protecting West Africa’s endangered amphibians and ecosystems.  

For 23 days our expedition team traveled throughout Ghana:  
(1) Conducting educational programs;  
(2) Searching for endangered rainforest frogs;  
(3) Restoring habitat for endangered amphibians;  
(4) Exchanging knowledge with Ghanaian biologists; and  
(5) Working to improve and accelerate amphibian conservation efforts in Ghana. 

Join an online presentation all about the SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition on October 14th, 2016:
On Friday, October 14th, at 10am San Francisco Time, SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Co-Founder Dr. Kerry Kriger will hold an online video conference all about the SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition. In this presentation, Dr. Kriger will discuss the expedition’s successes and show many amazing photos from the SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition. All are welcomed to join in on this interesting and informative discussion about our amphibian conservation efforts in West Africa. 

Join online from PC or Mac:
https://zoom.us/j/580658577
Or Telephone:
Dial: +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll) or +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll)
Meeting ID: 580 658 577
International numbers available:
https://zoom.us/zoomconference?m=RTRJPWLYN5EZwdmFPrByFTYsYQtPch14

ghana 2016 night spirit

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Introducing West Africa's First Amphibian Conservation Centre

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana has secured a building and work is underway for the construction of West Africa’s first amphibian conservation education centre. It is strategically located in the home region of Ghana's flagship Giant Squeaker Frog, thus, dubbed the "Sui Amphibian Conservation Education Centre (SACEC)".Arthroleptis krokosua juvenile
The critically endangered Giant Squeaker Frog (Arthroleptis krokosua).

Funded by Whitley Fund for Nature, it's a three room building with an infusion of both modern and traditional architecture, comprising a library and a computer/technology centre. With the support of over 50 daily local volunteers including women groups, the building will be completed and commissioned on the 5th birthday of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana, 22nd September 2016.

The commissioning of SACEC will be broadcast by Germany’s biggest media house, DW-TV at a grand durbar of dignitaries including SAVE THE FROGS! founder, Dr. Kerry Kriger and other staff, politicians, educationists, conservationists, traditional leaders, and local people. All frog and nature lovers are also invited to be part of this historic event. Together, we can save the frogs, and save the world!

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The SACEC before restoration. There was a lot of work to be done!
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Back view of the building. 
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Demolished parts of the front view of the building.west-africa-amphibian-conservation-centre-6
Front view of building under reconstruction.
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Progress made on front view of building.
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With the roof nearly collapsed, ceiling panels needed to be added.
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This reconstruction of this building was done entirely by volunteers.

With your support, the Sui Amphibian Conservation Education Centre will be a model for amphibian conservation efforts throughout all of West Africa! Please donate to ensure the future success of the SACEC!
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Fire Threatens the Survival of the Critically Endangered Giant Squeaker Frog

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With less than a week before the SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition, our team around the world has been busy preparing for our rigorous frog-saving campaigns in West Africa. To our dismay, we received terrible news last night from our friends in Ghana.

While suffering from malaria, SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Executive Director Gilbert Adum reported to us that a fire has devastated much of the Sui forest, which is the last known location of the critically endangered Giant Squeaker Frog, Arthroleptis krokosua.

Read more: Fire Threatens the Survival of the Critically Endangered Giant Squeaker Frog

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana 2016 Interns

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana has recently won the prestigious Whitley Fund for Nature Award, helping to fund their West African conservation projects to save the Giant Squeaker Frog, one of the world's most endangered frogs. An important part of this funding supports the invaluable help of two interns.

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana is pleased to announce the following emerging amphibian biologists as SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana 2016 interns: Prince Adu-Tutu and Isaac Nyame. These interns will receive three months intensive training under the supervision of West Africa’s finest amphibian conservation scientists, Gilbert Adum and Sandra Owusu-Gyamfi. Prince and Isaac will also have unlimited access to resources that will build their capacities in amphibian research, conservation, fundraising and public speaking.

Prince Adu-Tutu
Prince is a final year Wildlife and Range Management student at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST). He is also the President of SAVE THE FROGS! KNUST Chapter. As a young researcher, Prince’s greatest interest is to study and contribute important information on Ghana’s data-deficient frog species. Prince hopes to use his experience in social media marketing to promote awareness about Ghana’s vanishing frogs and SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s conservation efforts to protect them. He will also collect data from social media activities for his Bachelor of Science project, “The Impacts of the Internet and Social Media on Natural Resources Management in Ghana.”

prince adu tutu save the frogs ghana 2016 intern

Isaac Nyame
Isaac is an aspiring conservationist currently in his second year studying Natural Resources Management at KNUST. He is also the projects coordinator of SAVE THE FROGS! KNUST Chapter. Isaac has volunteered on several amphibian projects including helping to plant 500-plus native tree species along KNUST’s Wewe River to protect the campus’ 12 frog species. He hopes to develop himself through this internship to become a better conservationist and promote awareness among local people using his linguistic skills in Twi, Ghana’s widely spoken local language.

isaac nyame save the frogs ghana 2016 intern

Save The Frogs Day in Chiana

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana held a successful Save The Frogs Day Celebration in Chiana, Upper East Ghana. They estimated to reach a total live participants of 300 local people for this year's Save The Frogs Day. With the training of new volunteers by our experienced Northern Regional representative, Alex Akebeh, they reached 300 more people. Campaigns were intensified especially in schools and households, encouraging people to appreciate frogs and nature. They organized radio broadcasts which reached an estimated 1,500 people who tune in everyday to the local station, Nabina Radio.

STF Day 2016 Chiana

STF Ghana's Gilbert Adum wins $51,100 frog conservation award

We are pleased to announce that the Whitley Fund For Nature has awarded SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s Gilbert Adum with a frog conservation grant in the amount of 35,000GBP (US$51,100) to further his efforts protecting Giant Squeaker Frogs (Arthroleptis krokosua), one of the world’s most endangered frog species. Gilbert was awarded this prestigious environmental prize at The Royal Geographical Society in London in front of over 550 guests including Sir David Attenborough and the daughter of the Queen of England.

Ghana gilbert whitley award

Since the founding of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana (www.savethefrogs.com/ghana) in 2011, Gilbert Adum has catapulted Ghana into the world conservation spotlight. Gilbert was selected from 130 applicants worldwide. Sir David Attenborough said this of Gilbert and the other internationally-acclaimed award winners as they received their Whitley Award: "Empowering local people, who understand what the problems are, and who have the local knowledge, determination and vested interest to find the solutions is the very best way to ensure long term protection for the natural world."

You can watch Gilbert Adum's enthusiastic speech as he receives his award:

Watch the award announcement video here, narrated by David Attenborough:



Listen to this great interview BBC World Service had with Gilbert Adum about his Whitley Fund for Nature Award:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03shv15

More congratulatory messages continue to pour in from all over the world in recognition of Gilbert Adum's Whitley Fund for Nature Award, including from Germany’s Environment Minister, Barbara Hendricks: “I am absolutely delighted that one of the Humboldt Climate Protection Fellows has received this prestigious award." Gilbert spent the past 18 months in Germany working on climate change issues as they relate to West Africa’s amphibians, and managing SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana from afar:
https://www.international-climate-initiative.com/en/news/article/a_green_oscar_for_iki_climate_protection_fellow/

Gilbert is the first Ghanaian to receive this prestigious award. Gilbert's success was highlighted in Modern Ghana and other African news outlets:
http://www.modernghana.com/news/689947/ghanaian-conservation-leader-wins-a-green-oscars-award.html

 

Congratulations to Gilbert and the SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Team!

World Bank Project Officer Appointed to Empower Communities to Save Ghana’s Frogs

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana, West Africa's premier and leading non-profit amphibian organization has appointed Mr. Nicholas Aidoo as its Community Conservation Coordinator. Mr. Aidoo formerly worked as a World Bank Community-Based Rural Development Project Officer, creating economic opportunities in beekeeping for 65 communities in southwestern Ghana.

The position of Community Conservation Coordinator is new and as the first officer, Mr. Aidoo will lead in the development of alternative livelihoods for local communities previously dependent on endangered frog habitat. One frog in particular to benefit from this conservation initiative funded by the UK-based charities, Whitley Fund for Nature and The Rufford Foundation, is the Giant Squeaker Frog, one of the world’s rarest and endangered animals. Mr. Aidoo is also a native speaker and well-versed in Twi, Ghana’s most widely spoken local language. Thus, he will also take lead in the translation of relevant conservation education materials from English to Twi. This will help to make knowledge and awareness accessible to the local people who matter most in the protection of Ghana’s frogs and wildlife.

nicholas aidoo save the frogs ghana

Gilbert Adum of STF! Ghana Wins $14,700 Award to Tackle Illegal Mining

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Executive Director Gilbert Adum was recently awarded £10,000 ($14,700) from UK-based Rufford Foundation to boost his team's efforts to save frogs threatened by mining in western Ghana’s Sui forest.

Artisanal illegal miners left pits uncovered when they were forced out of the Sui forest. Gilbert and his team identified these pits as death-traps to several frogs including the Giant Squeaker Frog, one of the world’s rarest animals. With the grant funding, Gilbert and his team will close up the pits and replant areas with native trees. “Elsewhere, uncovered mine pits have caused the lives of many people," says Sandra Owusu-Gyamfi, Ghana’s first female amphibian biologist and Associate Executive Director of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana. "Therefore, covering up the pits and revegetating the areas will not only help to save frogs and other wildlife but also human lives.”

Gilbert warns the Ghanaian public to be wary of the dangers these mine pits can pose. He has also called on government, corporate societies, funding agencies and other conservation groups to join hands in doing more to save frogs and wildlife threatened by illegal mining activities in Ghanaian forests.

Atewa Mining Atiwa

Job Announcement: Community Conservation Coordinator In Ghana

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana

Job: Community Conservation Coordinator In Ghana
Closing Date for Application: 25th May 2016
Job Location: Kumasi and Sefwi-Wiawso


Organization Overview
SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana is West Africa's premier and leading non-profit organization dedicated exclusively to amphibian conservation, and is the first international branch of USA-based non-profit SAVE THE FROGS! We conduct research and conservation activities in places where amphibians are most vulnerable to threats from climate change, habitat destruction, invasive species, diseases, over-harvesting and pesticide use.


Job Description
As part of our Whitley Fund for Nature Award (whitleyaward.org/winners/saving-ghanas-frogs), we seek a self-motivated and dedicated individual to take up the position of Community Conservation Coordinator. The successful applicant will lead in the development and implementation of alternative livelihoods in beekeeping for local communities dependent on endangered species habitats. S/he will also assist in promoting amphibian conservation education among relevant stakeholders. Thus, we seek out someone who can also assist with the translation of amphibian conservation education resources and beekeeping manuals from English to Twi (local language).


Position Responsibilities
The Community Conservation Coordinator will:

  • Lead in the development and implementation of alternative livelihood program in beekeeping
  • Operate a Community Development Fund on behalf of local communities
  • Act as the focal person between local communities and other key stakeholders (academic institutions, private sector, governmental and NGOs)
  • Work with the Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) team to appraise the effectiveness of beekeeping as a sustainable and viable conservation model
  • Assist with the translation of educational materials from English to Twi


Specific Requirements of Candidates

  • Minimum of bachelor degree in Business Management/Administration, Rural Studies or Project Management
  • Strong financial background
  • At least two years of practical experience in community-based alternative livelihood conservation initiatives. Knowledge in beekeeping is an added advantage.
  • Strong linguistic skills in Twi language
  • Experience in driving, with a valid driver’s license


Annual Salary Range: 18,000-20,000 Ghana Cedi (including remuneration and social security and health insurance coverage)


Application Process
Applicants should submit a recent resume (not more than 3 pages), and cover letter (no more than 200 words) relating to this position. All applications should be sent to ghana@savethefrogs.com. Shortlisted applicants will be invited for interview in Kumasi, and the successful applicant should be available for work starting June 2016.

Important Notice
For your cover letter, find below some relevant links about our Whitley Award project:

bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03shv15
whitleyaward.org/winners/saving-ghanas-frogs/
discoverwildlife.com/news/discover-who-has-won-years-green-oscars

2014-Squeaker-Frog-group-Gilbert-Kids1-2014-06-212014-Squeaker-Frog-Seedlings-Community-members-22014-Squeaker-Frog-transporting-seedlings

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Travel to Africa with SAVE THE FROGS!

In September 2011 I traveled to Ghana with a small goal: give presentations in schools. That trip resulted in the formation of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana, which has become the most active international branch of SAVE THE FROGS! and has inspired thousands of Africans and people around the globe to take action for amphibians.

In September 2016 I will return to Ghana to lead the SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition -- and you are invited to join me. Our goal will be to protect Ghana’s amphibian populations, empower the next generation of Ghanaian frog conservationists, and expand the international network of environmentalists interested in protecting West Africa’s endangered amphibians and ecosystems.

We will be joined by 16 environmental professionals and frog enthusiasts and travel Ghana for 17 days:
(1) Conducting educational programs;
(2) Searching for endangered rainforest frogs;
(3) Restoring habitat for endangered amphibians;
(4) Exchanging knowledge with Ghanaian biologists; and
(5) Working to improve and accelerate amphibian conservation efforts in Ghana.

If you are interested in traveling to Africa with SAVE THE FROGS! for this once in a lifetime experience, please download and read through the Expedition Summary.

Gilbert Adum Save The Frogs Ghana

"I got an e-mail talking about the Ghana trip in September and it sounds like an amazing experience." 

— Jacqueline

The 2016 SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition will create a stronger SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana and will broaden Ghana’s base of amphibian expertise, ultimately resulting in healthier frog populations and vibrant human communities living in harmony with their natural surroundings. I am extremely confident that our 18-member SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition Team, which will combine decades of amphibian conservation experience into one cohesive group with a shared mission, will be able to produce tangible results for Ghana's amphibians on a scale never before encountered.

Save The Frogs Ghana Ecotour

In my travels to over 50 countries around the world, I have never been anywhere more in need of environmental assistance than Ghana; and I have never been anywhere that more wholeheartedly welcomes the SAVE THE FROGS! message.

For anyone who has ever wanted to make a positive social and/or environmental impact, this is one of the greatest opportunities you will ever have.

ghana expedition frogs
SAVE THE FROGS! Co-Founder Gilbert Adum (left) will be joining us in Ghana along with several other SAVE THE FROGS! biologists and environmental experts.

Whether or not you can travel to Africa with SAVE THE FROGS!, I encourage you to make a list of all the people you know who would be interested in donating to fund the Expedition. I am currently preparing crowdfunding technology that will enable you set up your own crowdfunding page within the SAVE THE FROGS! website, so that you can eaily provide your friends and colleagues with a way to donate, all the while tracking your fundraising impact.

Afrixalus dorsalis Michael Starkey

I hope to see you in Ghana in September 2016!
Dr. Kerry Kriger
SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana
Co-Founder & Board Member

Kerry Kriger - Ghana

Gilbert Adum Shortlisted For Prestigious Conservation Award

We’re pleased to announce that SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s work with the Giant Squeaker Frog has received international and prestigious attention: The Whitley Fund for Nature’s annual Whitley Awards shortlist of finalists includes SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana’s Executive Director Gilbert Adum.

The Whitley Award is a prestigious international prize that honors “exceptional individuals who, through their outstanding conservation work in developing countries, are redefining the way people engage with the natural world in the 21st century.”

Gilbert and seven other finalists were selected from a pool of 130 applicants from all around the world. The awards ceremony will be on April 27th, 2016 in London at the Royal Geographical Society and will be attended by Sir David Attenborough and the Princess Royal.

Like or share this article and show your support for Gilbert and Ghana’s frogs; we hope they win their deserved share of the total £245,000 ($346,001.25) project funding!

www.savethefrogs2.com/ghana

Gilbert Adum gives a presentation about the importance of Ghana's frogs.

The Pollination Project contributes to SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana efforts in the Atewa Hills

Congratulations to SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Associate Executive Director, Sandra Owusu-Gyamfi for winning a $250 award from The Pollination Project. The award will enable Sandra and the SAVE THE FROGS! UCAES Chapter to organize the 8th Annual Save The Frogs Day in the Atewa District in Ghana, home of the critically endangered Togo Slippery Frog (Conraua derooi). This year’s celebration will be, Saving The Iconic Togo Slippery Frog To Save Livelihoods. Events will include a 30-minute radio program where we talk about the current state of frogs in the Atewa Hills Forest Reserve and the implications that threats to their survival will have on livelihoods of the residents. There will be an accompanying street parade with drumming and dancing for frogs. During the parade, we will display signs to exhibit the effects of habitat destruction on frogs and the implications this has for local livelihoods. Signs will read, “Watch Atewa’s frogs die and witness a surge in crop pests,” “Atewa’s frogs are vulnerable, and so are you,” and more. We will wrap-up the day with a soccer match between two local communities and a key note address delivered by Ms. Owusu-Gyamfi. This event is expected to bring together over 300 participants and more through social media campaigns.

The Atewa Hills Forest Reserve is Ghana’s most biodiverse yet seriously threatened wilderness area. It is home to the critically endangered Togo Slippery Frog, a close relative of the world’s largest frog, the Goliath Frog (Conraua goliath). Within this area, there are widespread illegal mining and logging activities funded by both local and foreign individuals and organizations. These activities are destroying critical habitats of the frog and other natural resources including water bodies that irrigate farmlands and supply over five million Ghanaians with drinking water. In recent years SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana, together with other local non-profit conservation organizations, has been spearheading campaigns to get the government of Ghana to upgrade the status of the Atewa Hills Forest Reserve from a reserve to a national park for the permanent protection of frogs and other co-occurring biodiversity. This year’s Save The Frogs Day, will actively involve local people in the fight against the destruction of this unique forest to save local livelihoods. Thanks to The Pollination Project for supporting this campaign!

www.savethefrogs.com/ghana

Kwabeng chapter ghana save the frogs 550

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Expedition 3

The SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition

In September 2016, SAVE THE FROGS! will lead an international team of 18 amphibian biologists and frog enthusiasts on the inaugural SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition. The mission of the expedition is to protect Ghana's amphibian populations, empower the next generation of Ghanaian frog conservationists, and expand the international network of environmentalists interested in protecting West Africa's endangered amphibians and ecosystems.

Please download the 2016 SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition Summary here.

"From all the information provided in the Expedition Summary, it seems to be a very life-changing experience that would be a shame to miss."
Ashley Alwine, Pensylvania

The SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Expedition is a collaborative effort organized by SAVE THE FROGS! and SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana.

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