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Re-Frogging America: the wetland we built in Shingle Springs

On October 14th we built a 72′ x 36′ wetland for endangered California Red-Legged Frogs on private property in Shingle Springs, CA (near Sacramento). Building wetlands on private land is a fantastic way to provide habitat for amphibians and outdoor play areas for children, while educating the local community about the value of wetlands and wildlife. The land we restored was once a vibrant wetland but was long ago drained to create dry land for agriculture. This wetland project was in partnership with the Amphibian & Reptile Conservancy and the Center for Wetlands and Stream Restoration. Assisting with the project were biologists from British Columbia, Kentucky, Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area. You can see lots of photos of our Shingle Springs wetland on this brand new webpage:
www.savethefrogs.com/shingle-springs

The cost to implement this project was $3,715 and we still seek donors to help us pay for the construction costs. Please support our wetland restoration efforts by donating to SAVE THE FROGS! so that we can pay off the wetlands we just built and continue to Re-Frog America! We have designed 16 other wetlands and we depend on your support to keep these efforts going. All donations to SAVE THE FROGS! are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law and everyone who donates $50 or more between now and October 31st will be acknowledged in the Thank You section of ourwww.savethefrogs.com/wetlands page. Thank you for helping us Re-Frog America! Please also mark your calendars forMarch 22nd-28th, 2015 and plan to join our next round of Wetland Construction Workshops in northern California so we can teach you how to build wetlands.


Thank you for donating and making our wetland construction efforts possible!

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The wetland we built in Shingle Springs, CA

We built this 72′ x 36′ wetland by shaping a shallow hole in the ground and compacting the clay soil so that rainwater and surface water from uphill will not be able to escape. We expect the wetland to dry at least once per year, which will help prevent fish and non-native American Bullfrogs from establishing populations.

Shingle Springs wetland

Shingle Springs wetland

SAVE THE FROGS! Biologist Kathlyn Franco sprays water in the hole to moisten the soil and assist the excavator in compacting the clay:
Shingle Springs wetland

Shingle Springs wetland

Wetland expert Tom Biebighauser teaches the art of constructing homes for toads:
Shingle Springs wetland

We laid out straw to prevent erosion and to assist the seeds we planted. The straw retains moisture and makes it difficult for birds to find and eat the seeds.
Shingle Springs wetland

Shingle Springs wetland


This drainage ditch turned the Quail Hollow Wetlands into a dry field. We designed three wetlands that could be built to restore this damaged ecosystem. More info on that in a future newsletter!

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