research

SAVE MANASLU’S FROGS! Research Expedition

manaslu Budhi Gandaki River flowing swiftly biraj shrestha

SAVE THE FROGS! Task Force Member Biraj Shrestha returned to the Manaslu Conservation Area in March 2017 for a three week research expedition into some of the world’s most dangerous montane amphibian habitats. The “SAVE MANASLU’S FROGS! Research Expedition” was the first expedition of its kind. SAVE THE FROGS! thanks our generous donors who helped …

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Amphibian Research Assistant Positions In Kumasi, Ghana

k-wrap wewe river

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana seeks three undergraduate research assistants to assist in the collection of vital data on the biology and ecology of amphibians, as part of its Wewe River Amphibian Project (K-WRAP). The project is in collaboration with the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Wildlife Department, and is funded by the …

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How To Write An Amphibian’s Name Correctly

Amphibian Names

In an effort to (1) increase consistency; (2) improve our website visitors’ experience, and (3) reduce errors in writing amphibian’s names, we provide these guidelines on How To Write An Amphibian’s Name, and we encourage all authors in the SAVE THE FROGS! community to read, understand and implement them.

Save The Frogs Research Project on Chytrid Fungus in California Published

rana boylii alameda creek sarah kupferberg

In 2015, SAVE THE FROGS! received a grant from the Alameda County Fish & Game Commission to research disease outbreaks in Foothill Yellow-Legged Frogs (Rana boylii) in the San Francisco Bay Area. The research was published in the journal Ecosphere. You can read the abstract below, or download the PDF of the publication here. Photo …

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Climate Change and Brazilian Frogs

A new Crossodactylodes species was found at Pico do Itambe State Park at South Espinhaço Range, Southeastern Brazil, living in an area smaller than one square kilometer, and dependent on a single species of bromeliad. Due to its restrictive habitat and micro-climatic requirements, climate change and bromeliad-collecting are probably a threat, but the effects of climate …

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